Duty of Care in a Crisis event by Fortress - 4th October

  • 04 Oct 2018
  • Dennis

Over many years of working with government departments and multinational companies, both in real crises and simulation exercises, I saw a wide range of crisis outcomes.

 

The differences in these outcomes led me to reflect on what it was that marked out the best teams from the rest.  I then set out to discover if recent research findings from the fields of neuroscience and psychology could help to provide a rationale as to why some crisis teams appear more able than others to demonstrate agility in response and a capacity to sustain high performance in the face of ambiguity, scrutiny and urgency.

 

The first key finding was that differences in leadership style had a central role in team performance. At one end of the spectrum some leaders seem to feel a need to demonstrate a mastery of detail and avoid the counsel of specialists, whilst at the other end of the spectrum some leaders freeze in the face of critical uncertainty.

 

The first approach can lead to ill-informed decisions taken in haste, based on the leader’s ‘gut-instinct’, whilst the second leads to a ‘paralysis-by-analysis’ approach resulting in the organisation constantly reacting to external pressures. The work by Nobel Laureate Daniel Kahneman, and others, on thinking styles and cognitive biases, provide important insights into how to optimise decision-making under pressure.

 

The second key finding was that the way members interact, both formally and informally, is an important differentiating factor. Project Aristotle was conducted by Google to determine the predictors of super high-performing teams.

 

Results from the two-year global study indicated that there were five predictors of team success, with ‘psychological safety’ being the biggest single predictor of high-performing teams.

 

Psychological safety is the ability of team members to feel able to offer succinct contributions without feeling that their views will be dismissed or ignored.

 

In my presentation at the ‘ISO 22330 - Duty of Care in a Crisis’ event hosted by Fortress Availability Services Ltd on Thursday 4th October, I will highlight the implications of these research findings. I will also provide practical guidance on how to promote sustainable high-performance in crisis readiness programmes and during a real-world event. 

Other experts in the field also speaking at this event are: 

  • Gianluca Riglietti, BCI – The value of planning, exercising and training.
  • Jon Mitchell, Clearview - Maximising employee engagement in resilience
  • Richard Stephenson, Yudu – How communication technology helps meet the duty of care.

For the full agenda and to register for this free event go to: http://www.fortressas.com/duty-of-care-in-a-crisis/

 

There will also be time after for networking and the opportunity to view the Fortress Crossharbour recovery centre, so you can see for yourself what they are doing differently and how they have taken on board the sentiment of ISO22330.

 

Presenter

Dennis served as an officer in the British Army where his career focus was anti-terrorist operations and international crisis planning. He was Deputy Director of the UK’s Defence Crisis Management Centre and commander of a unit on anti-terrorist operations.  He was awarded an OBE for outstanding operational leadership. 

 

Following his military service he set up a consulting firm providing specialist services to top-tier companies and government agencies around the world. For more than a decade, he led teams that delivered a wide range of resilience and crisis management projects, including financial markets crisis and cyber-attack simulations for many of the world’s leading companies. His company also provided contingency planning support for government agencies including disaster preparedness and response to terrorist attacks. 

Dennis exited his Consulting firm in 2015 to undertake a full-time academic research programme into personal resilience and now holds an MSc in Applied Psychology. He is also MBCI accredited.

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About the author

Dennis Flynn

Dennis served as an officer in the British Army where his career focus was anti-terrorist operations and international crisis planning. He was Deputy Director of the UK’s Defence Crisis Management Centre and commander of a unit on anti-terrorist operations. He was awarded an OBE for outstanding operational leadership. Following his military service he set up a consulting firm providing specialist services to top-tier companies and government agencies around the world. He led teams that delivered a wide range of resilience management projects, including financial markets crisis and cyber-attack simulations for many of the world’s leading companies. His company also provided contingency planning services for government agencies including disaster preparedness and response to terrorism. Dennis holds an MSc in Applied Positive Psychology. Positive psychology is the science of the conditions, behaviours and processes that contribute to the flourishing or optimal functioning of people, groups, and institutions. Outside work his interests include trekking in remote hill areas and in 2017 he successfully completed a 13-day, 300 km coast-to-coast self-supported challenge trek across the Scottish Highlands. He is also a keen downhill skier, for which he has more enthusiasm than skill.